SolCrete.com Click Here For A Quote
Home Price Your Project Check out our Jobs of the Month Contact Us! FAQs See Our Videos
 
 

"Patching Things Up" - Acid stain on concrete

 
acid-stained-concrete-floor-1-web-th acid-stained-concrete-floor-2-web-th acid-stained-concrete-floor-3-web-th acid-stained-concrete-floor-4-web-th acid-stained-concrete-floor-5-web-th acid-stained-concrete-floor-6-web-th

Sometimes applying an acid stain on concrete can be a little challenging, especially when it's a commercial job as was the case in this Dallas, TX project. This job lived up to its promise. This was an up-and-coming Mexican restaurant that was in desperate need of a major floor redo because the previous tenant had left behind a VCT (Vinyl Composite Tile) floor that was peeling off. To top it off, plumbers came in and tore up and patched the concrete floor because there were also issues from the plumbing in the bathroom. The plumbers then left behind another problem—how to make it all look good.

So we got down to brass tacks. First, we had to clean the entire floor, getting off as much of the glue and other crud as possible. Then we talked to the plumbers before they wrapped up their repairs, asking them to make the patches as smooth as possible. Finally, we spoke with the customer, making sure they realized what was going to happen. Communication is key when you have so many issues to start with. It helps everyone get and stay on the same page, and helps us meet your expectations. Normally we recommend a microfinish overlay when we come across floors with a lot of patches because when you resurface the floor, it looks brand new. However, the owners wanted a rustic look and weren't concerned that the patches would be visible.

It's amazing to see how much the composition of the floor will affect the final appearance of an acid stain on concrete. Both the patches and the original concrete floor have the same smooth finish, but what a difference in appearance! The same acid stain was sprayed on both, but because the patch is made from different concrete from the rest of the floor, it won't stain the same; in this case, it came out much lighter. That's the nature of stained concrete floors. The final result can be difficult to predict but always looks great. The next project shows what happens when we spray an acid stain over a roughly textured interior concrete floor.

Previous: "What the Glue Means to You" Acid Staining Home Next: "Back from the Edge"