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"What the Glue Means to You" - Concrete stain

 
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Often we come across floors that have linoleum on them like this one had in McKinney, TX. The bad news is that even after pulling up the linoleum and cleaning the floor, we can't always get all of the glue off. The good news is that the glue works very well with acid stain, as it did with the black concrete stain we applied here because it creates interesting random effects and patterns. These effects usually happen when linoleum, carpet underpad or glued down carpet (normally found in commercial settings) are on the floor. To wrap this job up, we sprayed on a concrete sealer that enhances its natural beauty.

While this acid stained project came out looking beautiful, remodeling projects that have linoleum, wood, laminate, or tile can be tricky. All tend to leave behind a trace of what was on the floor after removing them, and some leave more traces than others. It's very important that all parties have the same understanding of what the final outcome of the concrete stain will be. This is what we call "managing customer expectations."

By the way, please don't confuse glued down carpet, usually found in offices, with carpet in residential settings. Often in homes it's the carpet underpad (the foam padding underneath the carpet) that's glued down and not the carpet itself. Home carpet installers use an even coat of glue all over the floor to make sure the pad sticks well, but the glue isn't unmanageable. We are able to get most of it up when we prep and clean the floor. The remaining glue left behind is usually in small, random patches that work very well with an acid stain motif. It's the glued down carpet in offices that can be more difficult.

FYI, it's almost impossible to get one hundred percent of the glue off because no concrete is perfectly flat. We use buffers and other equipment to pull up the bulk of the material, but because the concrete floor has low spots, the buffer can't quite get at it. Even hand scraping using razor scraper blades and other tools won't get it all up. However, if done correctly, a concrete stain will still create beautiful results. In the next decorative concrete project, you'll see what happens when an acid stain meets major repairs.

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