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"Where's Waldo?" - Acid stained concrete resurfacing for floors

 
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Ok, his name really isn't Waldo, but can you spot the doggy? He felt right at home as soon as we wrapped up this Flower Mound, Tx concrete resurfacing project. To complement the floor, we sprayed a black acid stain, highlighting it where it counts. Black is kind of a formal color but the doggy didn't mind; he yawned and stretched right out like he owned the place. There are many different types of concrete resurfacing options available for interior floors but if you are looking for a smooth surface, the best option is the microfinish overlay.

What exactly is concrete resurfacing? It's the process by which we apply a thin concrete coating over your existing floors. It can be done both inside and outside and there are many finishing options available from smooth (microfinish overlay) to slightly coarse (skim coats) to textured (trowel downs and stamped overlays). This section will be about the microfinish overlay.

So why use a microfinsh overlay? It always depends on your expectations. In most homes where we are asked to do an acid stain we almost always have go with the concrete resurfacing option first. The simplest reason is because when the home is being built, neither the builder or his contractors really care about what's happening to the concrete floor. They spill, scratch, and hammer as well as drip paint and glue all over the floor because they figure it will be covered up by carpet, tile, wood, or linoleum. When we pull up your existing flooring we find this mess waiting for us and as thorough as we are in cleaning it up we can't always get it all out. Anything left behind can show up in the final floor finish. We resolve these issues with a microfinish overlay that buries them under a concrete coating. This thin coating (averaging around 1/8" thick) is made up of a combination of cement, sand, and a special glue that makes it stick firmly to the concrete floor. Now, there are different types of concrete resurfacers; some types are one coat, two coat, and even three coat applications. We use all types, choosing the one that is most appropriate for the situation we find on the floor. All readily accept acid staining and water staining (we'll explain that one later) but each will give a different look at the end of the day. We'll explore some of the differences in the next project.

Microfinish Acid Stain Home Next: "Level Headed"